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Professor Nigel Morgan

Professor Nigel Morgan

On Saturday 18 April the Supporters of the Old Library enjoyed a fascinating talk on “The illuminated medieval manuscripts of Trinity Hall”. We were exceptionally fortunate to have such an eminent speaker in Professor Nigel Morgan, Emeritus Honorary Professor of the History of Art at the University of Cambridge and formerly Head of Research of the Parker-on-the-Web Project on the medieval manuscripts of Corpus Christi College.

Professor Morgan selected five of our most significant illuminated medieval manuscripts, gave an introductory description and then looked at each one in greater detail with regard to production, artistic methods and provenance. Here we will take a look at the first three manuscripts.

Josephus Historia MS.4

Josephus Historia, Trinity Hall MS 4

MS 4 Flavius Josephus’s Historia Antiquitatis Iudaice

Josephus was born in Jerusalem and was a first-century historian. His History of the Jews is based on the Hebrew Bible, beginning with the creation of Adam and Eve. The inscription at the front of this wonderful 12th-century manuscript tells us that it belonged to Brother William of Monkland in Herefordshire, which was a cell of the Benedictine Abbey of Conches in France. Professor Morgan compared our manuscript to other manuscripts from Herefordshire and revealed stylistic similarities in the decoration (including the decorative use of small circles) which is typical of Herefordshire production in the second quarter of the 12th century.

MS 2

Historiated initial, illuminated by the “Simon Master”. Trinity Hall, MS 2

MS 2 Ralph of Flavigny’s Commentary on Leviticus

The instructions of Leviticus contained, amongst other things, moral teachings on marriage and divorce. The fact that Henry VIII had no less than three copies is hardly surprising considering his need to find moral justification for his divorce from Catherine of Aragon in order to marry Anne Boleyn! This manuscript dates from the second half of the 12th century and was made for Simon, Abbot of St Albans (1167-1183). The illumination of this manuscript is very distinctive and can be linked stylistically to other work by the artist known as the “Simon Master”, identifiable through the style of the figures and facial types in his historiated initials and his use of green outline for the initial frames. The “Simon Master” was probably a professional, lay illuminator who travelled as a team with a scribe as far as France and perhaps even Denmark to produce manuscripts on commission. There are four manuscripts by the “Simon Master” in Cambridge libraries, including ours.

The east end of St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury. Trinity Hall, MS 1

The east end of St Augustine’s Abbey. Trinity Hall, MS 1

MS1 Thomas of Elmham’s Speculum Augustinianum

This manuscript, which is a history of the Abbey of St Augustine’s in Canterbury written by Thomas of Elmham, dates to about 1410. There are two full-page images. The map of the Isle of Thanet shows the lands belonging to the Abbey and depicts the legend of the pet deer of Queen Domne Eafe which traced out the boundary of the lands of the Abbey’s manors. The map has the East at the top (instead of the North) and has recognisable place names, including Margate and Broadstairs.

Detail showing the white hart of Queen Domne Eafe. Trinity Hall MS 1

Detail showing the white hart of Queen Domne Eafe. Trinity Hall MS 1

The plan of the East end of St Augustine’s Abbey is a remarkable record of an important place of pilgrimage. It shows the High Altar with two doorways leading to the chapels behind which contain the gold and silver shrines of saints associated with the Abbey, including St Augustine of Canterbury himself. On a ledge above the high altar we can see the relics of saints and six books in the centre. The Latin inscription above tells us that these were “Books sent by Gregory to St Augustine”.

Books above the high altar. Trinity Hall MS 1

Books above the high altar. Trinity Hall MS 1

It is almost certain that one of these books was the Abbey’s great treasure, the Gospels of St Augustine (now in the Parker Library, Corpus Christi Cambridge). This manuscript therefore has the earliest known depiction of St Augustine’s Gospels!

The Gospels of St Augustine, Parker on the Web

The Gospels of St Augustine. Parker on the Web

In Part 2 we will look at our other manuscript treasures which featured in the talk.

References

Supporters of the Old Library Trinity Hall on Facebook and on the Trinity Hall website

Wikipedia for Josephus, the Book of Leviticus, the Benedictines, St Augustine of Canterbury, Thomas Elmham, and Domne Eafe.

Parker on the Web http://parkerweb.stanford.edu/parker/actions/page.do?forward=home

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What has the Yellow Earl, who left Eton at the age of 12 and devoted his youth to playing sport, to do with Trinity Hall, a premier academic institution? The link is tenuous, as you will discover if you read on, but nonetheless tangible, as will be immediately apparent: in our special collections we have a set of books that came from the earl’s library at Lowther Castle!

Trinity Hall's set of books from the library of Lowther Castle

Trinity Hall’s set of books from the library of Lowther Castle

The Yellow Earl was the second son of the Third Earl Lonsdale and little importance was given to his education (hence his misspent youth on the sports field). His elder brother duly inherited the title and the management of the estate at the young age of 23. However, St George (the Fourth Earl had a most unusual name!) unfortunately died three years later in 1882 after a short illness. It was now the turn of poorly prepared Hugh Cecil Lowther, the Yellow Earl, to take up the title and he made a spectacularly bad job of it.

The Yellow Earl set about spending his fortune, and he spent in a big way! According to Wikipedia “He bought chestnut horses, carriages and many other extravagances. He had yellow-liveried footmen, a groom of the bedchamber, a chamberlain and a master of music to supervise the 24 musicians who travelled from house to house. His household travelled in a special train.” He loved horses (he became Senior Steward of the Jockey Club), he loved cars (he was first President Automobile Association) and he loved yellow. Indeed it was his passion for yellow – the Lowther family’s traditional racing colour – which gave rise to his nickname the Yellow Earl.

Portrait of the Yellow Earl outside Lowther Castle (BBC's Antiques Roadshow)

Portrait of the Yellow Earl in the grounds of  Lowther Castle (BBC’s Antiques Roadshow)

It took a while, but by 1935 the Yellow Earl was spent up. He was forced to move out of Lowther Castle because he could no longer afford its upkeep. When he died in 1944 the title passed to his younger brother Lancelot Edward Lowther, who was an alumnus of Magdalene College Cambridge. To raise money, the Sixth Earl held a large auction of the contents of Lowther Castle, including its library (and our set of books), in 1947.

Detail of the title page of

Detail of the title page of our set of books

After an interval of five years the books found a new home. Here another big spender (on a less spectacular scale) enters the story! This man was George Edward Larman, an alumnus of Trinity Hall and a bibliophile. Larman was a very different kind of man – he was not a spendthrift, instead he used his wealth to build up his own personal library. In 1952 he bought a handsome set of books “An essay towards a topographical history of the County of Norfolk” to add to his collection. The books, which are by Francis Blomfield and were published between 1739 and 1775, came from the library of Lowther Castle. They are handsomely bound in gauffered leather, with a gilt centrepiece of a wreath of oak leaves surrounding the family name “Lowther” and surmounted by a coronet.

The gilt-stamped centrepiece on the Lowther bindings

The gilt-stamped centrepiece of the binding

It is doubtful if the Yellow Earl ever looked at these books when they were in his library (he was too busy living it large) but we can be sure that Larman did! He proudly inscribed his name and the date of his acquisition in the front of volume 5. Larman was fascinated by Tudor and Stuart history, heraldry, the history of British Catholics and local history. He read widely and his library was immensely important to him. He bequeathed his extensive library to Trinity Hall and we continue to make fascinating discoveries in the process of completing the project to catalogue his collection.

Larman's inscription recording the acquisition of the volumes in 1952

Larman’s inscription recording the acquisition of the volumes in 1952

Postscript

Lowther Castle is now a magnificent ruin and is open to the public. You can find out more about the Yellow Earl in the two latest episodes of the Antiques Roadshow from Lowther Castle. The first episode was transmitted on Sunday 19 April and the next episode will be aired on Sunday 16 April. People in the UK can watch the programmes on iPlayer for 28 days after the original transmission date.

References

Biography of Hugh Cecil Lowther Wikipedia

Lowther Castle http://www.lowthercastle.org/

BBC Antiques Roadshow

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Hundreds of woodblocks from the great Plantin Press in Antwerp were shipped to London for a magnificent new edition of John Gerard’s “The herball or generall historie of plantes” published in 1633. Gerard’s book first appeared in 1597, and the new edition of 1633 was revised by the apothecary and botanist, Thomas Johnson. It was so popular that it was quickly reprinted in 1636.

John Grerad, from the title page of the 1636 edition of his "Herball"

John Gerard, from the title page of the 1636 edition of his “Herball”

John Gerard (c.1545-1612) was a herbalist and curator of the London physic garden of the College of Physicians. His patron William Cecil, Lord Burghley, was one of the most powerful men in Elizabethan England (and Chancellor of the University of Cambridge) and Gerard was also employed as superintendent of Burghley’s gardens in the Strand and at Theobald’s in Hertfordshire.

His herbal, which was written in English rather than Latin, was a great success despite the fact that he was not regarded as a scholar by his contemporaries. He was condemned for borrowing widely from other scholars, including Dodoens and Lobel, without giving them due credit – a clear example of Elizabethan plagiarism!

Nevertheless, in his revised edition Thomas Johnson (d. 1644)seeks to excuse Gerard’s failings. “His chief commendation is, that he out of a propense good will to the publique advancement of this knowledge, endeavoured to performe therein more than he could well accomplish; which was partly through want of sufficient learning … and although there were many faults in the worke, yet judge well of the Author.” However, Johnson was at pains in his edition to rectify some of Gerard’s shortcomings and the work of 1633 contains his extensive revisions.

The Plantin woodblocks which arrived in London for the new edition had originally been made for an edition of Rembert Dodoens’ herbal “Stirpium historiae pemptades sex”. They are beautifully executed in a lively style and show excellent botanical detail. This made them a valuable resource and eminently suitable for re-use in other publications, as was the case here.

The "pretty Perian tulip", Tulipa Persica

The “pretty Persian tulip”, Tulipa Persica

Amongst a comprehensive array of botanical illustrations in the herbal, there are 30 woodblocks of the genus “tulipa”. Gerard is somewhat overwhelmed by the task of describing the many varieties of tulip available at the time. Instead he confines himself to a few, saying “each new year bringeth forth new plants of sundry colours not before seen; all of which to describe particularly were to rolle Sisiphus stone”. Among the tulips illustrated are “the purple tulip”, “the bright red tulip”, the “white tulip with purple streakes”, “the pretty Persian tulip having a red floure with whitish edges” and “the late yellow, with sanguine spots and a blacke bottome”. Gerard also describes some of the tulips he has seen in cultivation including one “in our London gardens, of a snow white colour, the edges slightly washt over with a little of that we call blush colour”.

The "many branched tulip with a yellow floure", Tulipa Serotina

The “many branched tulip with a yellow floure”, Tulipa Serotina

Thomas Johnson adds a footnote about tulips “I do verily thinke that they are … the Lillies of the field mentioned by our Saviour, Mat. 6.28, 29”. He gives the following reasons “First, their shape: for their floures resemble Lillies; and in these places whereas our Saviour was conversant they grow wilde in the fields. Secondly, the infinite variety of colour… And thirdly, the wondrous beautie and mixtures of these floures.”

The Old Library’s copy of Gerard’s herbal is the 1636 edition, coincidentally published when tulips were at the height of fashion. At this time “tulip mania” had taken hold in the Low Countries, with prices for bulbs reaching their peak in March 1637.

Ballerina Tulip

Tulip “Ballerina”, Trinity Hall gardens

Tulips remain popular spring flowers today. The flower beds of the Old Library, Trinity Hall are planted with two striking varieties which flower in April and early May: the orange and gold “Ballerina” and the appropriately named “Black parrot”. Despite the early season this year, tulip enthusiasts will still have a chance to see a myriad of tulips in bloom if they visit the specialist stands at the Chelsea Flower Show.

Tulip "Black Parrot"

Tulip “Black Parrot”, Trinity Hall gardens

The Old Library’s copy of Gerard’s herbal was recently conserved by the Cambridge Colleges Conservation Consortium through the generous support of alumnus Richard Ferens (TH 1957-1960) and his wife Penelope in celebration of their Golden Wedding.

References

Most of the refernces are from Wikipedia

Gerard’s “Herball” can be viewed online: https://archive.org/details/herballorgeneral00gera

The Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp is open to the public and has UNESCO World Heritage status

Trinity Hall gardens: http://www.trinhall.cam.ac.uk/about/gardens/

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Last term the Old Library hosted a visit by a group of retired members of the Royal Navy which included several alumni of Trinity Hall. Nearly all had served in the Navy and been posted to Russia, either in National Service or as Defence Attaches, diplomats or interpreters, and several had taught Russian in universities. It was a wonderful opportunity to take a different look at the material in our special collections and I was suprised at the riches I discovered!

Shipping at the port of Sebastopol. From Pallas's "Travels through the southern provinces of the Russian empire in the years 1793 and 1794"

Shipping at the port of Sebastopol. From Pallas’s “Travels through the southern provinces of the Russian empire in the years 1793 and 1794”

Historically Trinity Hall had a strong link with the Navy as a result of its teaching of the civil law. This equipped Trinity Hall lawyers for a career in either the Ecclesiastical Courts or the Admiralty Courts because both courts used civil law and not common law. This explains the existence in the Old Library of a number of books relating to naval matters.

We have a charming late 17th-century (ca. 1660-1690) manuscript “Sea terms and geographical tracts” (MS.32) which deals with definitions of seafaring terms and contains a digest of geographical information necessary for understanding naval affairs.

“Sea terms and geographical tracts” (MS.32)

“Sea terms and geographical tracts” (MS.32)

In addition, the Old Library has a two-volume manuscript, dating from ca.. 1693-1710, a “Miscellany on Admiralty and Maritime Law” (MS.43.1-2). Written in several hands, this manuscript contains notes on civil law relating to Admiralty law which would be of direct relevance to any Trinity Hall law student intending to make his career in the Admiralty Courts. It belonged to a law student of All Souls, Oxford, whose signature at the front is dated 1693. This student is none other than the notable lawyer and later Master of Trinity Hall, Sir Nathanael Lloyd!

Manuscript "Miscellany on Admiralty Law". This opening relates to "Pyracy"

“Miscellany on Admiralty and Maritime Law” (MS43). This opening relates to “Pyrates”

Continuing the seafaring theme, the Old Library also contains the “Life of Admiral Lord Nelson” (London, 1810) and two first editions of the voyages of Captain Cooke, “Voyage towards the South Pole” (London, 1777) and “Voyage to the Pacific Ocean” (London, 1784). All “must haves” for the gentleman’s country house library and for the fellows of Trinity Hall.

General Map of the Russian Empire. Frontispiece to Coxe's "Account of the Russian discoveries between Asia and America"

General Map of the Russian Empire. Frontispiece to Coxe’s “Account of the Russian discoveries between Asia and America”

But what of Russia? Well, the Old Library has a small collection of books on voyages and travels. These include an “Account of the Russian discoveries between Asia and America” by William Coxe (London, 1780) containing wonderfully detailed maps of voyages; “Travels into Poland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark” also by William Coxe (London, 1784) which has full-page engravings of Russian landmarks including St Basil’s and the Kremlin; and E. D. Clarke’s “Travels in various countries of Europe, Asia and Africa” (Cambridge, 1810-1823), the first part of which is on Russia Tartary and Turkey.

A Finn in her national costume. From Johann Gottleib Georgi's work published in St Petwersburg in 1776

A Finn in national costume. From Johann Gottleib Georgi’s work (St Petersburg, 1776)

Moreover, some recent additions to our special collections from the library of the late Lawrence Strangman include several books on Russia. Most of these have delightful hand coloured plates.  Johann Gottleib Georgi’s early work “Description de toutes les nations de l’empire de Russie” (St. Petersburg, 1776) contains brightly coloured plates which influenced many subsequent publications including the illustrations in the Russian volumes of “The world in miniature”, Ackerman’s pocket series edited by Frederick Shoberl (London, 1822-23).

Hand-coloured plate prineted by Ackerman for Shoberl's "World in Miniature"

Hand-coloured plate of a Kamtchaka couple. Printed by Ackerman for Shoberl’s “World in Miniature”

Travels through the southern provinces of the Russian empire in the years 1793 and 1794” by P. S. Pallas (London, 1812) contains sophisticated hand-coloured plates of the topography and peoples of the Crimea. Also in Strangman’s collection is a volume of essays “Fugitive pieces, on various subjects” (London, 1765) which includes a chapter by Lord Whitworth, ‘An account of Russia, in the year 1710’. Of particular interest to our visitors was the detailed description of the vessels in the shipyards on the Don!

Postscript

Bringing the Russian connection into the 20th century, Trinity Hall is famous for two notorious alumni who spied for the Soviet Union: Alan Nunn May (TH 1930) and Donald Maclean (TH 1931). Although these men were contemporaries at Trinity Hall they were not close friends. Both were high achieving undergraduates (Nunn May gained a First in mathematics and physics, and Maclean a First in modern languages) and both were members of Cambridge University Communist Party. However, the similarity ends there.

The outgoing Maclean was a member of the Trinity based communist study group with Blunt, Burgess, Cairncross and Philby (the Cambridge Five). He joined the Foreign Office in 1935 from where he passed secrets to the Soviet Union. Maclean defected to the Soviet Union in 1951 and died far away from the country of his birth in Moscow in 1963.

Nunn May, an altogether quieter man, stayed on at Trinity Hall for a PhD in physics and then went to King’s College London in 1936. In 1943-44 he passed on vital atomic bomb secrets to the Soviet Union, saying at his trial at the High Court in 1946 “I thought this was a contribution I could make to the safety of mankind”. Nunn May was sentenced to 10 years, but was released early (in 1952). After several years teaching at a university in Ghana, he spent the rest of his days living quietly in Cambridge, although there is no record of his ever returning to darken the doors of Trinity Hall!

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The Old Library doesn’t seem to conform to any particular classification scheme–at least, none that I can fathom–but over the past few months it’s become clearer and clearer to me that the books are in some kind of order. I’ve found myself in a bit of a ‘history of England’ rut, with pretty much every book for miles (slight exaggeration) another assessment of the same topic. So when the next title on my list promised the “sufferings of the clergy”, I thought things might finally be looking up. I anticipated, at best, a discussion of seventeenth century torture devices in vicarages; at worst, an exposition of the shoddy living conditions the clergy had to endure, things like poor TV reception and no hot water after 8am.

Obviously, it was none of those things. In fact, it turned out to be over seven hundred pages of brilliantly executed passive aggression. The book’s full title is An attempt towards recovering an account of the numbers and sufferings of the clergy. It was compiled by clergyman and biographer John Walker (1674-1747) of Exeter, and printed in London in 1714. It was written as a response to an earlier work, printed in 1702, by Edmund Calamy (1671-1732), called Abridgment of Mr Baxter’s narrative. This was, itself, a rearrangement of another work, the original (presumably) Mr Baxter’s narrative, which had suffered at the hands of an ill-experienced indexer. (We’ve all been there.) What made Calamy famous at the time, though, wasn’t just his ability to recognise bad indexing when he saw it. It was the ninth chapter of his book, which was a list of nonconformist ministers silenced or thrown out after the Restoration in 1660. Wykes (2004) describes the book as “a popular statement and defence of nonconformity against the high-church attack on dissent and toleration”.

Image

Edmund Calamy, 1671-1732

The publication of this list created a bit of a storm. In the second edition of his book, printed in 1713, Calamy himself acknowledged it: “for some Years there was scarce a Pamphlet came out on the Church side, in which I had not the Honour of being referr’d to in the invective part of it” (1713, in Wykes, 2004). But I’d be shocked if any of these books Calamy mentioned included an attack quite as lengthy, profound and vitriolic as Walker’s Sufferings of the Clergy. Given that it appeared the year after Calamy wrote this acknowledgment of infamy, I’m tempted to believe that Walker took it as a challenge. Walker’s idea was to produce a similar sort of volume, but this time listing the conforming clergy who were deprived and sequestered by the puritans in the period before the Restoration. He admits as much in his Preface: “[the work] was wholly occasioned by the ninth chapter of Dr Calamy’s Abridgment of Mr Baxter’s life” (1714, p. i).Image

It sounds vaguely admiring at this point, but Walker soon sticks the knife in. “I take it for granted”, he writes, “Dr Calamy himself knew as many reasons for his Work, as anybody else, and that he was not wanting to produce the Best of them” (1714, p. i). He continually compares his motivations to those of Dr Calamy: if he can write a list, then why can’t I? If you don’t object to Dr Calamy’s list, then you can’t object to mine. After a while it starts to read like an early eighteenth century rendition of “Anything you can do, I can do better” from Annie, Get Your Gun.

This slightly obsessive attack on poor old Dr Calamy for whom, I’ll admit, I’m starting to feel sorry, runs to over fifty pages, after which Walker gets down to the actual business of the suffering. The book itself is divided into two parts: first, a history of ecclesiastical affairs prior to the Restoration, designed essentially to justify the treatment of nonconformists after the Act of Uniformity in 1662 based on their behaviour when they were in charge (du Toit, 2004); and second, the list itself. I’m  impressed by Walker’s organisation and indexing skills, and I’m starting to suspect that he was secretly a librarian. The famous ‘suffering’ varies in type and severity, from George Williamson of Bristol, who got kicked out of his vicarage (1714, p. 4), to George Crakenthorp of Essex, who was accused of being a “common tippler, and often drunk” (1714, p. 219). There’s Samuel Taylor of Suffolk, who was left so penniless that he had to beg relief from the “corporation for ministers’ widows” (1714, p. 383) and William Knight of Huntingdonshire, whose ruination set off a chain of events which led to his grandson getting his maid pregnant. Worst of all, the maid was a “hog-herd’s daughter” (1714, p. 288). There’s a Mr Eaton of Cheshire, whose wife was carried to a dunghill (1714, p. 236), presumably against her will. Walker reports that several members of the clergy died before the Restoration, but a lot do have happier endings. Take Thomas Paske of Clare Hall, Cambridge, for example. He was restored and his great worth was proven beyond all doubt when, on one day, he was visited by “three bishops, four privy counsellors, two judges and three doctors” (1714, p. 141). Someone definitely needed to explain the concept of ‘office hours’ to Thomas Paske.

ImageImage

Walker’s Sufferings portrays these poor ministers as maligned, unjustly accused of all sorts of scandal, replaced by unsavoury gentleman, harrassed and persecuted simply for their loyalty. There’s a genuine sense of their collective martyrdom shining through and, without a copy of Calamy’s Abridgment in front of me it’s difficult to tell if Walker copied that too. I imagine he did. But they say the best form of flattery is imitation, so maybe Calamy wouldn’t have minded too much after all.

References

Calamy, E. (1702). An abridgment of Mr Baxter’s history of his life and times. London: Printed by S. Bridge for Thomas Parkhurst [and two others].

Du Toit, A. (2004). ‘Walker, John (bap. 1674, d. 1747)‘. Oxford Dictionary of National Bibliography. Oxford: OUP. Accessed 23 Aug 2013.

Walker, J. (1714). An attempt towards recovering an account of the numbers and suffering of the clergy of the Church of England. London: Printed by W.S. for J. Nicholson [and five others].

Wykes, D.L. (2004). ‘Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732)‘. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: OUP. Accessed 23 Aug 2013.

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One of the great treasures of the Old Library is a manuscript of Boethius’ “Consolation of Philosophy” translated into medieval French (Trinity Hall Cambridge MS.12). This manuscript is illustrated throughout in a naive and lively style with images relating Boethius’ story.

These charming images provide a fascinating insight into the medieval mind and a unique view of the medieval world. Interspersed throughout the story are numerous full page illustrations of scenes from the Holy Scriptures and of the Chrisitan saints, including a number of images which tell the story of Christ’s Passion.

Christ's entry into Jerusalem (MS.12 14v)

Christ’s entry into Jerusalem (MS.12, f. 14v). Image (c) Trinity Hall Cambridge

Although these holy images seem to have nothing to do with the “Consolation of Philosophy” there is in fact a strong connection. The medieval French scholar Professor Sylvia Huot has pointed out that earthly suffering is the theme of most of the holy images in the manuscript. Depictions of the suffering of Christ and the ordeals of the saints were included in order to reinforce the central theme of Boethius’s work.

Boethius was a senior government official who in 524AD, having offended the king, Theodoric the Great, was stripped of his wealth and offices, thrown into prison and condemned to death. Whilst awaiting execution he was visited in a dream by Lady Philosophy who dictated to him a treatise on the futility of pursuing worldly wealth and power.

The resurection

The resurection (MS. 12, f. 34v). Image (c) Trinity Hall Cambridge

The central thesis of the Consolation of Philosophy is the assertion that lasting happiness is only to be found in a mind that is centred and philosophically recollected. The inclusion of images from the Scriptures in the Trinity Hall manuscript is in keeping with the medieval Christian interpretation of Boethius. These images of Christ and the saints are used to reinforce Boethius’s message of how to endure (and triumph over) the suffering of this world.

Christ at the right hand of God. Christ is depicted on the cross and npointing to the wound in his side (MS.12 f. 98v)

Christ at the right hand of God. Christ is depicted on the cross and is pointing to the wound in his side (MS.12 f. 98v). Image (c) Trinity Hall Cambridge

Boethius’s treatise was tremendously popular in medieval times and is still in print today. It was translated into many languages including into English by King Alfred the Great, Chaucer and Queen Elizabeth I amongst others.

References

The Consolation of Philosophy, by Boethius. (Penguin Books, 1999)

“The Chastelaine de Vergi at the crossroads of courtly, moral and devotional literature” by Sylvia Huot. Published in Philologies old and new, edited by J. Tasker Grimbert and C. J. Chase (Princeton, 2001)

Wikipedia for Boethius and the Consolation of Philosophy.

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Justin Welby, the new Archbishop of Canterbury, was educated at Eton and Trinity College Cambridge (no, not Trinity Hall but our younger rival next door!). His enthronement will take place in Canterbury Cathedral next week, on 21 March and will be televised by the BBC.

One item due to play a key role in the ceremony is the St Augustine’s Gospels (Corpus Christi College MS286). This magnificent manuscript is a vulgate text of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John and was probably brought to England by St Augustine in 597. The practice of using St Augustine’s Gospels for the enthronement of the Archbishops of Canterbury was revived in 1945. The Parker Librarian, Christopher de Hamel, will remain in charge of this precious manuscript throughout the ceremony.

St Augustine's Gospels viewed via the Parker Library on the web

St Augustine’s Gospels viewed via the Parker Library on the web

But why is a Corpus manuscript featuring in our Old Library blog and what its connection to Trinity Hall?

The answer lies in one of our own most precious manuscripts Thomas Elmham Historiae Abbatiae S. Augustini (Trinity Hall, Cambridge, MS1) created in about 1410-1413. On one leaf of Thomas of Elmham’s history is a remarkable early plan of the East end of St Augustine’s Abbey. It is finely drawn in red, blue and black and features the chapels of the East end, various reliquaries, the high altar and the altar screen.

Plan of the East end of St Augustine's Abbey (Trinity Hall Cambridge MS.1)

Plan of the East end of St Augustine’s Abbey (Trinity Hall Cambridge MS.1)

“At the top of the screen are six books identified by a small inscription as the books sent from Pope Gregory (the Great) to Augustine”. The entry in the Cambridge Illuminations exhibition catalogue continues, “It is intrinsically probable that they included the St Augustine’s Gospels.” Thus our manuscript contains the earliest depiction of the Gospels used for the enthronement of the new Archbishop! As one of the holiest works in Britain it is more than likely that St Augustine’s Gospels were kept as an object of veneration with other sacred texts above the high altar of the Abbey.

The six books above the high altar of St Augustine's Abbey

The six holy books above the high altar of St Augustine’s Abbey

The Abbey was destroyed during the dissolution of the monasteries and remains a ruin today. The monastic library was dispersed and its manuscripts came onto the open market. Our manuscript was collected by the antiquarian and Catholic sympathizer, Robert Hare (d. 1611), who was a great donor not only to Trinity Hall but also to the University Library. Thomas Elmham’s Historiae Abbatiae S. Augustini came to us as a result of Hare’s friendship with Henry Harvey (Master of Trinity Hall 1559-1585) and has been a treasured by the College ever since.

Robert Hare's signature

Robert Hare’s signature

The St Augustine’s Gospels can be seen at the Parker Library on Maundy Thursday, 28 March, from 2-4pm (for further information see Easter at King’s on the Parker Library blog). Thomas of Elmham’s History of St Augustine’s Abbey can be seen in September during bookable tours of Trinity Hall’s Old Library organised by Open Cambridge 2013 and the Alumni Weekend.

References

Historia Monasterii S. Augustini cantuariensis / edited by Charles Hardwick (London, 1858)

The Cambridge illuminations: ten centuries of book production in the medieval West / edited by Paul Binski and Stella Panayotova (London, 2005)

The St Augustine’s Gospels can be viewed at the Parker Library on the web

Parker Library blog

Open Cambridge

Cambridge Alumni Weekend 2013

Website of the Archbishop of Canterbury

Wikipedia for Justin Welby, Thomas of Elmham, St Augustine’s Abbey, and Henry Harvey

St Augustine’s Abbey is an English Heritage property and can be visited

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